Spencer’s Book

Spencer showed me a book he got, and I was so intrigued. As I started to read it (not really, because you cannot read it; it is a book with gorgeous pictures and doodles that are aligned perfectly), I was trying to break the encryption for the first five pages, until I realized that it was not encrypted. It was just imagined.

And the pictures inspired me. I went through the book page by page and was transported back to my childhood, when I was sick with chicken pox at the age of six. My beloved grandmother wanted to do something special for me, and went out and bought the entire set of an encyclopedia, all brilliant color pictures and all.

In my bed, I read all 12 volumes of them and was in awe of the wonders of nature, the animals, the plants, the humans, and everything about this world we live in. This feeling was dug up from somewhere very deep in my mind while looking at this book.

We are inspired so little nowadays. But when I first saw Spencer’s design of LETTERSWIRL and heard the sound he designed for it, they also inspired me. Those sounds still take me somewhere long ago where I am standing in a sunny field, and feeling a warm breeze through my hair. I must have been very young, I would imagine.

…..Of course, the title “Codex” sounds like a plural for codec, which I have to download to my users’ computers all the time, and I liked it immediately.

“How are word games good for our brains? Such activities keep us intellectually engaged by getting us to ‘stretch’ our thinking. Unlike timed activities, which offer us a different kind of challenge, word games (and puzzles, board games, and the like) grab our attention, get us to make new connections, and give us the chance to think outside of our mind's box.” - Cynthia R. Green, Ph.D., Psychology

http://www.sharecare.com/health/functions-of-memory

“The Alzheimer's Association says that ‘higher levels of education appear to be somewhat protective against Alzheimer's, possibly because brain cells and their connections are stronger.’ It also suggests that Alzheimer's patients take advantage of this information by getting mental stimulation working word puzzles of various types. Word puzzles such as scrambles can help keep the brain active and alert.”

http://www.ehow.com

We all know that word games help to stimulate our brains, but how do we keep playing day after day, so that we keep our brains well-maintained, especially without getting bored?

You need a very engaging game like LETTERSWIRL so that you purely enjoy the game, without thinking about these benefits!

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